Highlighted reviews

Science Fact

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The Atomic Human: Neil Lawrence **** 19 June 2024 - A curate's egg: clever points on the distinction between human and artificial intelligence - and how to deal with it - but sometimes hard to read in its near-stream-of-consciousness style.
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A Brief History of Stuff: Science Museum *** 17 June 2024 - Illustrated articles on 50 genuinely interesting objects - but lacks a consistent feel, coming across a bit too much like a collection of extended museum labels.
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Infinite Life: Jules Howard **** 4 June 2024 - An exploration of eggs throughout the history of life might sound a bit dull - but the storytelling (and the fascinating nature of eggs themselves) overcomes any concern.
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Revelation Space: Alastair Reynolds *** 24 June 2024 - Without doubt a sweeping, science-driven space opera, but Reynolds has got a lot better in 20-odd years - too long and loses impetus several times.
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Machine Vendetta: Alastair Reynolds ***** 3 June 2024 - One of the best writers of intelligent space opera packs a huge plot into this finale to the Prefect Dreyfus trilogy.
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The Affirmation: Christopher Priest **** 27 May 2024 - A fascinating, dream-like novel that takes the reader into the relationship between memory and reality, exploring what is real if memory can no longer be relied on - though it stretches things to call it science fiction.
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In the seventh Stephen Capel mystery, an impossible murder on a fairground ride opens up a trail that leads to Anglo-Saxon treasure, a mysterious tunnel and a deadly confrontation

When Stephen Capel and Vicky Denning meet historical fiction author Margaret LeVine at the Mop fair in Marlborough, they expect to discuss Capel's plans to start a literary festival - but on a fairground ride, LeVine is killed without anyone appearing to touch her. Soon, LeVine's is not the only life in danger as Capel uncovers connections in the literary world and the hiding place of a long-lost Anglo-Saxon hoard.

The Stephen Capel Mysteries bring the classic British detective story into the twenty-first century.

Feature - Speculation and Science

Our editor, popular science author Brian Clegg explains why, despite his concerns about speculation in science writing, had to include it in his latest book.

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